CURATED BY ANIA FREER

GOAT CURRY GALLERY

SHOP THE COLLECTION

Photography by Ania Freer © 

BINGY | WEAVING

Trained as a pastry chef, Bingy took up weaving late in life after having a stroke which left him without movement in three of his fingers. Over time he has developed a hat design which uses locally harvested calabash with a brim of woven screw pine. Bingy exhibits his work from a roadside rest-stop in Annotto Bay, hanging his piece on wooden beams and bamboo posts along the outside of the building.

Discover more

RANKINE | SIGN ART

Rankine took up painting after he broke his leg slipping on a banana peel. Determined not to let his injury hold him back, he traveled to Kingston and took a courses in sign painting. Using biblical references, photos, images from books, warnings, cautions, historical fact and his imagination, Rankine has developed a large collection of designs over the years. Rankine's mission is to create signs that will educate children and pass on important messages.  

Discover more

RACQUEL | WEAVING

Brown has been weaving since she was twelve years old, a tradition which runs in her family, passed down to her from her grandfather. Using screw pine, harvested from along the coast, Brown combines twill weaving, plating and plain weaving to create her baskets, adding little cross-stitches throughout her work for detail. Within Jamaica, the techniques and designs Brown uses have become rare to find.

Discover more

GEORGIE | WOODWORK

Born in the fishing community of Treasure Beach, Georgie captained boats for most of his life. Although he carves a variety of objects, his life as a fisherman continues to inform a lot of his work. Georgie carves wooden boats, which resemble the traditional dug-out canoes his father used to build by hand from cotton trees. This is a practice passed down from Jamaica’s indigenous Tainos.

Discover more

BAMBOO KING | WOODWORK

Bamboo King created his first animal head in the early 2000s, inspired by a bamboo root he dug up while collecting materials for a building project. In 2015 Bamboo King moved to a property along the coast in Annotto Bay where he established a sculpture garden using found objects collected from the beach. Stacked coal castles decorate the perimeter around his home accompanied by drift wood and animal head rods. Bamboo King’s work has a strong material basis which speaks to his deep curiosity about nature and the unique ways materials fit, balance and bind together.

Discover more
parallax

MADE IN JAMAICA

PAPAIŸ0 X GOAT CURRY GALLERY

A most fascinating curation of Jamaican artisans by Ania Freer's Goat Curry Gallery, who work with locally sourced materials to craft pure magic. 

SHOP THE COLLECTION

ABOUT THE CURATOR

MEET ANIA FREER

Ania Freer is a documentary filmmaker and curator based in Kingston, Jamaica. Her filmmaking practice centers on uplifting underrepresented voices within grassroots communities. She is the founder of Goat Curry Gallery and the filmmaker behind the documentary series REAL TALK. Ania has been working as an artist in Jamaica, using film, photography and writing to document stories and voices from remote communities across the island. Her work shines a light on everyday stories, oral histories and folklore told by community members; stories that often go unseen and unheard. Ania’s work goes beyond documenting these stories. In 2019 she curated her first group exhibition entitled ‘All That Don’t Leave’ to mark the end of a six-month curatorial fellowship through New Local Space Kingston. The show focused on unique craft practices and oral histories from seven artists working across Jamaica outside of mainstream knowledge. As a curator, Ania aims to give space to makers who have historically been marginalized from gallery spaces.

A VISUAL DIARY OF JAMAICA

THROUGH THE LENS OF ANIA FREER

News Ticker Demo
X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN X CARIBBEAN
EXPLORE NOW
parallax

Photography by Ania Freer ©